caitri: (Default)
 Many thanks to everyone who sent me birthday greetings and wishes--they were muchly appreciated!! <3 

I hope everyone is staying cool (and safe) during heatwave/storm season. I've taken (possibly too much) to working later at night and then sleeping in a bit longer during the heat of the day....but I'm still getting shit done, so.

I'm trying to think if I've been up to anything interesting lately and the answer is not really. I write and I do chores. "Yay."  I did get accepted into a class at CalRBS in August, so that's something to look forward to! But otherwise it's trying to keep routine and not get sucked into news/politics and whatnot on social media (emphasis on "try"...I'm terrible at it. I have gotten to where I probably "only" check the NYT six times a day or something). I keep thinking "I should post more" and then thinking "about what?," so.

Quick signalboost: Two of my friends had books come out this month! Lisa Edmonds just released Heart of Malice and Nicky Drayden just released The Prey of Gods. They are both kind of doing their own self-promotions, esp. Lisa, so if you can pick up their books and leave reviews on Goodreads or Amazon. Consider it good karma!
caitri: (Screw Subtext)
Where I am cranky and anxious for no reason. Or rather, I have reasons that overflow into one massive BLAH:

1) It's the end of the term, or rather, just past it, and yesterday I skyped with my advisor for our annual checklist/meeting I have to do to discuss my progress and whatnot. Which, I've had a good term; I've done a chapter and gotten a paper proposal accepted for a big conference next year which will fold into the next chapter. My advisor was happy and had good and useful thoughts on things, and I have a plan forward. And I also wrote several other essays this term for other forthcoming publications and sent in two sets of revisions. I am a good puppy. BUT I AM ALWAYS ANXIOUS because this is my default setting.

1a) A friend of mine has straight-up had two mini breakdowns in the last three days, the first about her diss because she has extreme burnout from writing and the other because she starts teaching two summer courses on Tuesday and the PTB raised the attendance cap without telling her. So while she has printouts and assignments and whatnot for a class of 35, she now has a class of 40, which doesn't seem like a big deal except it totally changes group assignments and the ability to read and return papers. And I'm kind of limited in helpful things I can say. Like, yeah, this sucks, but...welcome to academia? Where shit always gets piled on and fucked with?

2) I might have to deal with a IRL Troll tomorrow and am inwardly prepping. On the one hand, this person isn't as bad as others in the extended social circle, but they are still the kind of person who will go to a potluck without bringing anything or without helping in anyway, and who will purposefully try to redirect/distract conversations to themselves and their interests, and...I don't have the energy for mitigating that right now. So, wish me luck, I guess.

2a) I also tend to dislike holiday weekends, and today I braved the crowds to go grocery shopping, which was managable, but still. I just want to hunker down and do as little as possible, but I still have chores to do. *sigh*
caitri: by blue_hobbit (Don't Go Where I Can't Follow)
So AHA (American Historical Association) had their yearly meeting in Denver this past weekend; there was a SHARP panel on teaching book history, which I had put in for last year and got rejected, but Todd and Kevin got accepted. Todd opted to come stay with us as we could take the bus to the convention center, which was great, so we got to work on our Early Modern Poet battle cards on the bus ride and then got registered and whatnot. To be honest the AHA program was one of the most boring programs I've ever seen; we met with Kevin and had coffee and talked book history for a while, then grabbed lunch and went to hang out in the exhibit hall, which was *great.* So many presses and publishing houses with sales; at the Penguin table, you could get a free book if you signed up for their newsletter, so I signed up and got their last copy of Shapiro's Shakespeare in America anthology, while at the Knopf table hardbacks were $10 and paperbacks were $3, so I got Alexander Monro's The Paper Trail and Tom Holland's Dynasty, and then made myself stop because conference bags were smallish if zippered and there was still a load of snow and ice outside. Then it was time for the boys' panel, which was boring except for them (I felt SO BITTER I was rejected), and then we grabbed dinner and then the bus home.

Saturday morning Todd and I worked on my press a bit; the problem was the bitter cold, and how that makes cast iron difficult to work with. It looks like the main problem I've been having is the throw-off lever, which needs to be loosened up, and we sprayed some liquid wrench into the bolts but could never quite get it going. Since Kevin has a C&P as well, we're talking about maybe meeting up in Utah and helping Todd take his press apart for a thorough cleaning so the two of us can see how it's done, then go home and replicate that on our machines. So hopefully that is something we can do or summer or early fall, and then in October all three of us hope to meet at the RBS Bibliography conference--Todd got accepted, I haven't heard back yet, and Kevin didn't put in for it.

Saturday afternoon we played tourist and I finally got to take Todd to my favorite spots in town: for afternoon tea at Dushanbe (where you book in advance and then they bring out one of those tiered serving dishes with scones and sandwiches and sweets, and where for reasons passing my understanding none of my local peeps was willing to go), and to my favorite secondhand bookshop where we spent several hours happily combing through the just-organized-enough-to-be-useful-but-unsorted-enough-to-stay-interesting piles of books. At one point the young desk attendant came over to us and anxiously asked if we were rare book dealers or "just" collectors. We reassured him that we were collectors, with me a poor grad student and Todd a librarian. "Oh okay," the man said with great relief, "I could just hear the knowledge when you spoke." And that became our running gag of the day.

The *other* gag of the day, though not running, was when we went to the nature shop that largely specializes in cool rocks, some fossils, knick-knacks fashioned from rocks, and science kits for kids. Anyway, on one of the tables was a case filled with perhaps 6-8 or so objects made of stone, about the size and length of a mechanical pencil, each shaped slightly differently and of a different stone. At first I wondered if they were part of the intermittent fashion for magical wands (usually for Harry Potter fans who can drop fairly serious money on a lovely useless object, or for wealthy hippies to do the same), and then I saw there was a placard identifying them as "personal massagers." Which...puzzles me? Because they aren't actually big enough to be terribly exciting in either orifice, being stone it certainly doesn't vibrate so it's not going to do much for your clit, and also being stone of various kinds I wonder overmuch about cleaning and safety, and frankly wish I had taken a photo to send to Can I Fuck the Thing? on Tumblr. I missed it but apparently Todd picked one up to inspect it, then saw what it was, and had an "Ack!" moment, which I regret not seeing because sometimes I'm a terrible friend who enjoys a good laugh at someone else's expense. Anyway, quel mystery.

And then Sunday I had to see him off to the airport shuttle, and so ends the holidays, and so begins the year in earnest. I saw a meme that had a picture of Captain Picard that said "Damage Report" and then the commentary was "How I start every morning in 2017" which seemed very real to my experience. I remain determined to fight for what I believe in; I remain heartened on how thus far Congress is bending to public pressure on various issues. I think every day for the next few years is going to be like this, and it will be exhausting, and it will be necessary. But I remind myself, yet again, that the majority of people *do* have consciences and brains, and are on the right side of history; I can't remember if it was Dan Rather or Bill Moyers who wrote that the dying mule kicks the hardest. So: Keep the faith, my friends!
caitri: (bullshit)
I've been doing a lot of contemplating these last two weeks, while also trying to do keep my head above water with school and deadlines and all. One of the things I always struggled with in reading history was how was it possible for those scholars and writers who were killed during the Holocaust to not realize what was coming. Walter Benjamin's a good example. He was working on his Arcades Project, he put off leaving until, eventually, all travel visas were cancelled, and then he killed himself. We still read his work, but he left behind unfinished pieces and fragments, and I always found that unutterably sad on multiple levels.

And what I find myself thinking when I'm exhausted/scared of what's going on is how nice it is to concentrate on my work, to read less news and focus on what's "important" and my deadlines. But that's the slippery slope, right; I don't want to look up from finishing a chapter draft and realize that people are being rounded up and gods know what else. So being careful to stay engaged, to make my voice heard, to signalboost the other voices, to not let things become "a new normal." But man, figuring out this new balance...it's a thing.

So my social media feeds have mostly become about signalboosting posts with information on how to assist Standing Rock, the ACLU, how to fight back against Trump, etc. etc. It gives me hope that people aren't lying down about these things; a local elementary school had swastikas spraypainted on its doors over the weekend, and the community made a wall of hearts to counter against it. So there's that. I earnestly hope and pray that we can continue to fight against the darkness, but it's already been only two weeks and I am so, so tired. But the fight will continue, because it has to. It has to.
caitri: (Don't Go where I Can't Follow)
I spent all of yesterday listening to people and trying to offer support and comfort where I can. Today my feed is filled with images of threats and attacks; I've seen reports of at least two people in extended social circles who have killed themselves because of the fear and emotional devastation. So here's this, and if you guys need me, I'm here:





Also: Here's the link to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline: http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/talk-to-someone-now/

IF YOU NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE, DO IT. IF YOU NEED HELP, ASK FOR IT. PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!
caitri: (The World is a Mess)
So sleep deprived this morning--went to bed late (but not too late), and just as I was drifting off the dogs needed to be let out. A few hours later Varamathras starts badgering me for breakfast, because he is under the impression that I will happily feed him at 4:30 or whatever. Then a bit after 5:30 get a text alert that a cop was shot in our area and to be extra vigilant etc. etc. Around 6 the police and news helicopters are out in force, which made the dogs anxious. Around 7 an all-clear goes out, they re-open the streets behind neighborhood, the helicopters depart, etc.

Now that it's over, it turns out the guy just shot AT cops and actually shot himself by accident. Which, I'm not sure if the initial reports were deliberate misinformation or just an accident (because I am cynical, what can I tell you) (I'm just saying, Tuesday night in Boulder before the students are fully back, what else did they really have going on?). Also with the abrupt time frame with the copters and their removal, I mostly thought of the scene towards the end of Fahrenheit 451 where the PTB manufacture the dramatic onscreen capture of Montag, when it's really some random guy who perhaps liked taking walks and who was filed away for just such a purpose because police state.

Anyway, now I really want to go reread Bradbury.
caitri: (Mochi rockets)
Since yesterday there have been raging wildfires about twenty miles from us. Now, it's across a mountain, and you can see the smoke behind it billowing up, and tonight you can smell it. The fire relief planes and stuff were going regularly this afternoon, and earlier they were saying that the burning is decreasing and that the winds may be turning it back. But.

Obviously I'm a fretting fretter of frettingness, but Scott is unconcerned. "This happens like every three years," he says. "This is why there are defensible lines. Even in the absolute worst case scenario and it leaped over the mountain and got within city limits it wouldn't be a thing because of all the fire breaks."

Okay. Fine. You say so. Look, there was an epic flood three years ago, that was scary, I do not want to get involved in evacuations and stuff again, please please please. Must work on my karma? But in the meantime: Obsessing over news reports and fretting.
caitri: (mouse heart)
So we got to go see the Dalai Lama speak this morning; that was cool. He's giving two talks today and the one we went to was "Eight Verses on Training the Mind;" he asked at the beginning how many people in the audience were Tibetan (about a fifth) and then how many were Buddhists (about a quarter) and sort of tailored the talk from there. He went back and forth between English and Tibetan (?), and most of the time when he was speaking English it was a sort of set talk, and when he went into Tibetan and the translator had to talk it was clearly more off the cuff--eg. in the beginning the Mayor of Boulder presented some presents, including a bicycle helmet (which he cheerfully wore for like twenty minutes) and then began his talk by mentioning how he doesn't ride bikes anymore but he did when he was younger, and the wonderful thing about helmets is that they mean you are going on a journey and you seek protection.

To be honest my favorite part was just watching him with people. For instance, at the beginning there was a troupe of Tibetan children in traditional garb to do a welcoming dance and song, and he made a point of smiling and waving and interacting with them. There was also a bit where I guess VIPs and such stepped forward to present and receive scarves (they didn't describe the ceremony so I'm not sure what it was, it was just clearly a ceremony and probably religious) and he always measured his interactions with people, eg. there were several Tibetans who were near tears and very emotional and he touched them very gently and spoke to them, and then with others, mostly westerners, he gave hearty back-slaps; a few times he touched people's hair with interest (the two, three times this happened it was with Asians, maybe Tibetans?) and kind of stroked the tops of their heads, and I...dunno what that was about, maybe it was a way of showing affection, comfort? Not sure. But he was very whimsical too; in addition to the helmet-wearing, at one point toward the middle he said "Okay, all the non-Buddhists can go to sleep now" and started talking more seriously about the teachings.

But I was also struck by the mix of religious, political, and popular there. Rep. Jared Polis was there and did a brief welcome, and then said he had to heed the call to action and was going back to DC to participate in the sit-in (and he got a long ovation for that). But we were also at the sports center, so the talk was in the basketball stadium, and the concessions stands were open and selling popcorn, nachos, pretzels, and sno-cones. Basically I was struck that one could listen to the living embodiment of one of the world's major faiths and eat nachos, THIS ENTERTAINS AND FASCINATES ME, and people did.

Finally: Another thing I thought was interesting was at the beginning the other speakers--esp Polis, but also the head of the Tibetan Association of Colorado (or something like that) brought up how the Dalai Lama can't ~say~ anything about China-Tibet relations, so they had to. Which is sort of an interesting thing of itself--being able to be politically silent but not silent.

And in case anyone is interested, the talk was drawn from his previous writing on the subject of the Eight Verses, and you can find the original verses with his commentary here.

So

Jun. 20th, 2016 07:59 pm
caitri: (Gamora)
I was going to post yesterday thanking folks for their kind birthday wishes, especially [livejournal.com profile] avictoriangirl, [livejournal.com profile] browngirl, and [livejournal.com profile] fritzfics! And then I heard about Anton Yelchin's untimely death, and I've just been incredibly sad since. He was young and brilliant and gone too soon, and somehow it's even WORSE because his death could and should have been preventable--io9 posted that his car model was among those listed in a recall in April for the exact rolling-away thing. Just. What a fucking waste. But all the memorials have been kind and lovely. Star Trek fans pride ourselves on being a family, and this is one of those times when it seems like we can fucking act like it. So.
caitri: (Cait Yatta!)
I'd meant to put up a year-in-review post before the new year, but, well, better late than never, yeah?

Favorite movies of 2015:

Avengers: Age of Ultron (I unabashedly loved it, and thought those who grumped about it were protesting WAY too hard.)

Crimson Peak (I fucking loved everything about this film. Just. Everything.)

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (I know, I'm surprised too, but I love how we have a recordsmashing hit with a lady protagonist, POC in the main roles, and the tons of OT3 fic!)

Favorite books of 2015:

Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon (This book, man--so well-written and absorbing, and I absolutely need to find the time to read all of Wollstonecraft's own books!)

SPQR by Mary Beard (I'm going through this one slowly because it is so dense with detail, but it's wonderfully written, and presents a lot of the classic history I'd already known in a whole new, contemporary context.)

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin (Epic apocalyptic fantasy on another world--really original writing, lovely and dark.)

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell (This is basically the queer YA fantasy I would have done anything to read when I was a teenager. I envy kids and teens these days with the bevy of SFF and queer lit that simply wasn't around when I was growing up.)

The Just City by Jo Walton (A delightful philosophical fantasy where Athena decides to make Plato's Republic real, and pulls its citizenry from across human history. So much fun. The sequel The Philosopher Kings wasn't quite as fun, though I delighted in the twist in the end there.)

~

I'm not going to even try to have hard resolutions this year, aside from a vague "Survive." I feel like life has been delighted in thwapping me about, and I'd love to have some real down time, but I don't think I have time for it, alas. Too much to do, too much to write!

But most of all I earnestly hope and wish that humanity would get its shit together this year, because I am deeply tired of our assholery. There's too much to do in this life, too many problems to solve, for people to spend their lives being hateful destructive creatures. I want my Star Trekky utopia, and I just have to hope, and do my part, to get there.
caitri: (Mochi rockets)
I am very tired and should probably just go to bed and try again tomorrow, but that's what sane people do. So:

1) I've decided this will be The Year that I try to get into the Book and Paper Intensive, which is an epic eight-day book arts workshop where they do different classes every year. So for half of it you do a basic course in the morning and then another in the afternoon, and in the second half you do a hardcore all-day workshop. Everyone I know who has ever been has flailed and sung its praises. And they have a scholarship, and the scholarship application period is December 1-31, and they only sent out info about it yesterday.

So to apply I have to put together a portfolio of ten things to basically show-off my skill level and interests. And write a statement. So today I scanned a bunch of stuff and started to think, "Hey, this doesn't look bad. There's a nice variety of papers here, handmade and marbled. That one broadside that has a poem I wrote looks decent. Those two artist books, um, don't look awful. Etc. So I waffle. And then the statement. It only has to be 200 words, but still. "I want to learn to make more things. Also better. Better and prettier than I make things now. You show me how? Please?" Yeah, needs work.

2) Also working on a side research project with a friend of mine, and something I've been trying to figure out for ages is when the shift of meaning occurred with "fanfiction." Originally back in the 1930s-1950s, it just meant fiction written by fans, not derivative or transformative works, which came later. Well lo and behold the OED has an entry, and mentions the 1944 Fancyclopedia as documenting the first meaning, and Jacqueline Lichtenberg writing in the 1975 anthology Star Trek Lives! about the latter. Now I suspect this latter citation is because it appeared in a mass-market book, so obviously it was in usage before then, but when? And so there's a Fan History group on Facebook and I thought I'd be bright and pose it to them.

WELL. A bunch of cranky old dudes. "What are you talking about?" "Fanfiction has always just meant amateur writing." "Where are you getting this from?" ... Uh, the OED? Also, have you read anything in the mainstream media in the past fifteen years, or hell, the last three? JUST CURIOUS.

Anyway. That's been my day. Well, no, I got other things done, and other things need to get done but still. I'm tired. So. 
caitri: (Cait pony)
I don't know what it is about this year except that I feel constantly busy and constantly behind. So, in no particular order:

* I got to go see Welcome to Night Vale live, which was awesome. CECIL HAS SUCH A DEEP MELLIFLUOUS VOICE AND SUCH A TEENY LITTLE MAN BODY. Just, wow.

* I mainlined Jessica Jones. I HAVE SO MANY FEELS YOU GUYS. Like, I feel like Joss Whedon probably watched it crying because that's exactly the sort of story he would have liked to write if Marvel hadn't made him stick to dudes and 'splosions. But aside from that 1) I love the MCU's themes of recovery narratives in general and here especially. 2) I love that David Tennant basically uses so much of his charm and wit that we've come to recognize as Whovian and then make it EVIEEEEEEL. 3) No one else has posted about this, but I really love how Rosenberg uses Will Simpson to break down "the nice guy." Like, how many times does he say he's a nice guy, how many times does Trish describe him as a nice guy, right up until the point he is fucking blowing the brains out of cops. (also: Jessica NEVER calls him a nice guy. In fact, she slaps him around and reminds him that as a cop he's supposed to protect and serve.) But anyway Simpson and Kilgrave are like the dual aspects of patriarchy--there's the obvious evil and then the just-under-the-surface evil. Just awesome. Ye gods I hope she gets a second season.

* CRIMSON PEAK. So many people on the SFF listservs have been like "Imma use this next time I teach the gothic nove" and yes, YES! I love how the use of books and writing and media, MEDIA! (I shrieked when Edith found the box of wax cylinders) interplays with the telling of the story. Also, yet another example of a powerful female protagonist and a platonic bestie. Gods bless you, Charlie Hunnam.

* Things I have done of late: I submitted applications for a BSA fellowship to spend some quality time going through Stationers' company records,and an Emerging Scholar prize because why the hell not. Also, I sent in the edits for my Maleficent essay and for my Mako Mori essay, both of which should be forthcoming next year, and which I got lovely comments from the editors on.

Uh. I feel like there's probably other things to mention, but--I forget what? So. There's me.
caitri: (Gamora)
I AM SO TIRED. Remember when I thought I was gonna have some down-time after those back-to-back conferences last month?

Ha.

Ha ha.

No.

I've gotten maybe 1800 words on my STBB/NaNo project? I'll probably have to drop out.

What I DO have are applications for a Bibliographic Society of America fellowship (which I can send off as soon as a second person confirms they are gonna do a rec letter for me) and an application for an Emerging Scholar Prize (which I can send off as soon as my diss chair says she likes it). I have a diss chapter my chair is pleased with, I have a set of essay edits due in January, and I have an outline with bits for a collaborative article. Also, I got some good feedback from my writing group on my fannish literary history project, so it's just to keep adding to that, bit by bit.

But in the meantime there's all of the attendant stress of holidays plus seasonal depression (it's dark! it's cold! DISLIKE!) plus getting roped into other things ongoing, and yeah. YEAH.

Did I mention I'm tired?
caitri: (chris vocabulary)
... I thought I'd pop up for a token LJ post.

The diss writing goes mediocrely. I finally said fuckit and emailed the draft-in-progress to my chair, because she often has wise words and can push me in the right direction, or at least A direction. I'm pointedly not thinking about how I need to revise what I have for a talk I'm giving next month.

In the meantime, I got my author copy of Fan Phenomena: Lord of the Rings last week; it has a chapter on Lothiriel fics in it. I'm also trying to finish up some revisions for a chapter on published fics for the Fan Phenomena: Twilight volume which will come out sometime next year.

I also just got back a list of requested revisions for my Pacific Rim chapter in another book. Begin rant: Read more... )

I'm also working slowly on Literary History of Fandom; I finished the intro and posted it here under f-lock, and I'm about a third of the way through chapter 1, so it continues apace. I keep revising my chapter outline because I keep thinking of things that need to be added... I do worry if it will end up being more of a historiography than not. But who knows.

I think that's kind of it. I get up in the morning, I make coffee, I sit down at the computer, and I take breaks with the dog. This is life.
caitri: (printer)
I cast about 70 lbs of type and made a nice little broadside. Also, I dodged two accidents where know-it-all DUDES made mistakes with the machine and sprayed MOLTEN LEAD OUT and that was how I had some stress muscle tension for two days. >_> But it was all very fun and productive and I totally want to go back.

Right now I'm handling the obligatory cross-examination of my travel receipts by the Business Office. Like, I have three non-itemized receipts from a cafe, all time-stamped between 7:50 and 8:10 am, all for around $5. GEE I WONDER WHAT I COULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASING THEN. >_<

Oy. Such is life. Now I need to get my ass in gear with writing.
caitri: (Cait Yatta!)
Scott flew in yesterday and we are having our first non-familial vacation in five years. We spent yesterday afternoon exploring Chinatown and today we walked all over Old Town. We toured the Notre Dame Basilica, which made me kind of sad: it's a gorgeous old cathedral filled with paintings and intricate sculptures and people taking selfies. There was a tiny, transparent-walled-off area for people who actually want to pray; one sad-looking woman was in there. This made me sad, and frustrated with the Christian faith as I so often have been. Like, I'm sure the money collected from the tourists--and, btw, the exit of the building concluded with a gift shop, of course--goes to the historic building's upkeep, but--it just seems odd and sad to have a location of faith transformed into a location of performance, if that makes sense.

Anyway, after that we walked down to a street of shops including some lovely art galleries, including a gallery of Inuit art. In a prominent spot was a statue of a Shaman throttling a Christian priest, and I loved it. Like, not only is it this image of an indigenous avatar abusing the invader, but it just so aptly demonstrated how I felt after leaving the church, so.

Then we went to the history museum of Montreal, which was a lot of fun, and then tonight we went to a Polish cafe where we had one of the most amazing meals I've had in ages: borscht, a charcuterie plate of pate, cheese, pickles, and pork stuffed with prunes, and bread, and then a plate of pierogies, potato pancakes, bigos, and kriti, with a peach crumble and sweet cream to start. SO AMAZING AND DELICIOUS O.M.G. Just. Yeah.

Anyway, tomorrow we are going to Quebec City!
caitri: (Cait pony)
I haven't had time to do much more than organize my pressroom so far, and with this month being busy like it is (Tuesday I leave for a conference, followed by a week of vacation, followed by going to New York for a class on typecasting) it's going to be ages before I get to actually do some printing. Sigh.

I've made some progress on the diss--I have a few pages of chapter 1 that are going to be tooled into a talk for a conference in October and then retooled again for an article. I just need to sit down and do it.

Speaking of articles, my essay on Star Trek reboot fandom is FINALLY out after over four years in publishing delays. The citation is here, but I suggest requesting it through your local library than ponying up $18, that's just highway intellectual robbery.

I can't believe half of summer is already gone--time flies when it is sunny and warm. I'm planning on hitting two conferences in October before I have to settle down for winter.

I need to update here more often, but I always seem to be running around or flailing rather than getting writing--any writing, fic (I have so many scraps and bits of WIPs that I should give up and have a ridiculous fic amnesty multi-post), diss, etc. Reviews I am able to keep abreast of, and notes on papers and on my book, but oy. OY.
caitri: (Mochi rockets)
I'll be speaking at a small symposium called Publishing Feminisms in Banff, which is pretty exciting both because it will be a small group (about thirty people) and it'll be my first international conference. So shiny. I'm worried about overlap with what I'm talking about and what the others in my panel will be talking about, and generally about the cohesiveness of my paper, which probably means I'm going to end up rewriting parts of it tomorrow and Monday nights, and also flailing. Which is cool, I mean, I'm a good speaker, so I'm not worried too much, but I'm a spaz, so I still like to practice.

Unfortunately, it'll be the first conference in a LONG time where I won't have at least one friend to hang out with, so I'm a bit anxious about the socializing part. Doesn't help that I'll be missing the opening reception tomorrow night either (that was my bad, because I overlooked how long it would take the airport shuttle to get there). They assigned me a roommate for cost-saving purposes, so hopefully we'll hit it off; plus it'll help a bit that they are providing most of the meals so it will be all of us in a room eating and chatting. The only thing about that is it sometimes means you have to sit there by yourself and watch everyone ELSE happily chatting away to one another, which is extra anxiety-inducing.

Anyways, fingers crossed, and wish me luck!! <3

Grumpiness

May. 15th, 2015 06:57 pm
caitri: (Mochi rockets)
Traveling to a conference on Sunday, and am more or less prepared. But I've had a frustrating week of writing and trying to write, and it's basically just GRR-inducing. And I know I need to just take a Deep Breath and then Get On With It, but it seems like I'm constantly interrupted by Real Life and Other Goings On, and just, like I said, GRR.
caitri: (Cait pony)
* I've discovered the Grey Havens Group, a Tolkien-centric fan and book group that meets regularly and geeks, and the people there are lovely and nice, and it's the first time that anything about Colorado has seemed remotely homey.

* I have my Age of Ultron tickets: I'm going by myself Friday morning so that I can have a pure experience before going with the Social Group on Saturday.

* I have discovered the Daredevil kink meme and O. M. G.
(Which, someone on there pointed out that Skye and Matt were at the same orphanage, SO!)

* A ridiculous portion of this week has been allocated to sorting out summer travel. I'm going to Banff next month, Montreal and New York in July, *maybe* CO Springs for Mythcon in August. Plane tickets, shuttle tickets, conference hotels, oy.

* I've gotten galleys on two fandom articles that I have dealt with. Links will be available when they are, uh, available.

* Todd has been agent of chaos geek and has helped me acquire a load of new type and furniture that will be moved with my press this summer. I AM SO EXCITE.

* The second meeting of the SF book club I started is this Sunday, and at least half the people have not finished or read the book, despite how I extended the date TWICE (once for an accountant friend who's life was hell prior to April 15 and once because I wanted to go to the Tolkien symposium). We're reading The Just City by Jo Walton, and we had an Australian vote to pick book, and IDEK the malfunction.

I am very tired today. If I seem cranky blame it on that.

Profile

caitri: (Default)
caitri

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112 131415
16171819 202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 21st, 2017 06:39 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios